“If we are creating ourselves all the time, then it is never too late to begin creating the bodies we want instead of the ones we mistakenly assume we are stuck with.” 
― Deepak Chopra

For the better part of history, humans have had a good relationship with eggs.

Even before ancient times, we’ve been consuming this nutrient-rich food.

It’s rich in amino acids, packed with protein, and only contains 70-80 calories.

Protein helps muscle growth, as well as connective tissue in your body. It’s also an essential building block for other parts of the body like your bones, teeth, skin and hair.

On top of that, eggs (particularly the yolk) deliver a lot of vitamins and minerals. This includes vitamins A, B12 and E, along with riboflavin, selenium and zinc.

You’ll also find lutein and zeaxanthin. These aren’t just good for the eyes – they also speed up your brain’s cognitive performance.

Best of all, egg yolk has choline which is crucial to maintaining your heart, brain and even your cells.

And here’s the kicker: eating eggs actually decreases cholesterol levels because of choline.

Recent studies have documented the benefits of eggs. In 2013, researchers at the University of Connecticut found that eggs helped people with metabolic syndrome by increasing their insulin sensitivity (which is a GOOD thing!).

(Dietary) Fat-Shaming: The Case Against Eggs

But then things took a dark turn for eggs in the post-World War II era.

Thanks to numerous studies done after the 1950s, all types of fat came under attack.

This led to the widespread belief that eating fatty foods was bad for you. It was thought that it blocks the arteries, and this perception still resonates today.

High levels of cholesterol were linked to cardiovascular disease and other epidemics like obesity and other illnesses.

However, this wasn’t the issue because high cholesterol is indeed life-threatening.

The problem was that these studies were skewed. They obscured the fact that the real culprit was overconsumption of grains and carbohydrates.
So everyone and their mother raised their torches and pitchforks against ALL types of dietary fat.

And so eggs were put in a bad light along with other “persecuted” foods in this dietary witch hunt.

Turning the Tide

However, there was other research done during the same time that disputed the status quo.

Slowly but surely, these opposing voices helped people realize that there was more to the fat puzzle than they first thought.

As it turned out, cutting down on protein-rich and fatty foods was a nutritional step backward.

Eating too many grains and processed sugar was the real cause behind diabetes, higher cholesterol levels and other conditions!

More importantly, they woke up to the fact that NOT all fats are created equal.

Saturated fats, while potentially harmful, can’t do much damage if you’re eating a low-carb and low-sugar diet. It’s even better if you’re also getting fiber and omega-3 from fruits and vegetables.

(And just so you know, your typical egg has less than 2 grams of saturated fat, so no real threat there.)

Meanwhile, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats are good for the body. They help deliver nutrients between cells, contribute to brain growth (fun fact: our brain is mostly made up of fat!) and offer other nutritional benefits.

But if eggs are good for you, then why are some people still AVOIDING them like the boogeyman?

And that brings us to the question of the hour…

Do Eggs Raise Cholesterol Levels?

Eggs of one sort or another are a firm favorite that show up in a lot of people’s breakfasts, but how many times have you heard people tell you that eating eggs will raise your cholesterol?

Science hasn’t completely settled the debate yet, but a new contribution to the topic has just been published in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

For this piece, researchers from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and Northwestern University looked back over large studies that recorded the diets, lifestyles, and cardiovascular diseases of 29,615 people. These people had an average age of 51.6 years and they were followed for an average of 17.5 Years.

When the researchers separated out daily cholesterol consumption, daily egg consumption, cardiovascular events, and deaths from the rest of the data, they found some interesting points:

The first 300 mg (milligrams) of cholesterol consumed per day has no measurable harmful effects on health.

Beyond the first 300 mg of daily cholesterol, every additional 300 mg increases our risk of a cardiovascular event like stroke or heart attack by 17 percent and our chance of death by 18 percent.

Beyond the first 300 mg of daily cholesterol, each half an egg increases our risk of a cardiovascular event by six percent and our risk of death by eight percent.

To unpick all of that, it doesn’t mean that you have to avoid eggs. In fact, it shows that eggs are fine in moderation, but how much is that exactly?

One egg, or one egg yolk to be more precise, contains 200 mg of cholesterol, which is about the same amount as you’ll find in a large steak.

This means that if you eat a large steak and an egg every day, together with the milk in your tea or coffee, you will be over the 300 mg safe limit.

But if you eat three eggs and three large steaks per week, and spread them out, your cholesterol intake will be below it.

Past research has actually shown that daily cholesterol intake doesn’t raise our cholesterol to harmful levels, which is why the American and British governments don’t recommend a daily cholesterol limit.

The reason why eggs (and meats for that matter) become unhealthy is probably because they have to be cooked to improve flavor and reduce the risk of Salmonella.

But when you heat cholesterol, its chemical composition changes in a process called oxidation. It is this oxidized cholesterol that clogs your arteries, not uncooked cholesterol.

So, don’t stop eating eggs just yet. They contain calcium, fiber, iron, potassium, zinc, selenium, B vitamins, vitamin A and other healthy nutrients, so if you keep your consumption under control, your favorite breakfast food can still be a heart-healthy addition to your day.

But if you’re still worried about your cholesterol levels then consider this proven and effective method of reducing them too…

The Truth About Cholesterol and is it deadly or vital

Below are 2 videos from the legend himself, Dr John Bergman. No matter if you have some kind of heart ailment or you think you are not at risk still learning the truth about cholesterol is very important.

Dr Bergman, publishes revealing videos on his Youtube channel and this kind information you’ll find now where in the mainstream media so do not forget to subscribe to his channel. These videos are quite long, so save the link for this page and watch at your convenience.

Should YOU stop eating eggs?

The answer boils down to a couple of basic factors.

According to a study by the University of Texas, approximately 1.7% of people living in the United States have egg hypersensitivity.

(Interestingly enough, the study also indicates that “Approximately 70% of children will outgrow egg allergy by 16 years of age and children are able to tolerate well-cooked eggs sooner than uncooked eggs.”)

However, even if you are one of those people who have a less-than-ideal reaction to eggs, you should know that there are varying degrees to this:

First of all, there are people who experience extreme symptoms like vomiting, swelling and other signs of an allergy.

Those who fall under this category should steer clear of eggs altogether.

There’s no sense in risking your safety when you can have an alternate source of protein and other nutrients.

Cases like these are often linked to a more serious condition (which we’ll be getting into in a bit).

But then there are people who produce histamine in their bodies as a response to eating egg yolk.

The symptoms of histamine intolerance aren’t the same as a full-on allergy. They’re not life-threatening, but they include feeling bloated and nauseous, as well as mental fatigue.

In this case, you might find that cutting out the yolks will make those less severe symptoms go away.

The Plot Thickens

Now, there’s another layer to egg intolerance that you need to know about.

As mentioned earlier, some people who can’t eat eggs at all – neither yolk nor whites.

The reason for this is a specific enzyme in eggs called lysozyme.

The main function of enzymes like this is to keep the egg yolk safe from potential threats such as bacteria. It cuts down these bacterial invaders on a cellular level.

But the problem is its ability to slip through the gut barrier, the protective layer found in the small intestine. This keeps out potential threats from entering your bloodstream.

The gut barrier is made up of a cocktail of saliva, gastric acid and pancreatic enzymes. This is designed to destroy foreign threats (e.g. bacteria, parasites, pathogens, etc.).

If this fails for some reason and harmful elements still get through, there’s another defense mechanism in place. This is a tightly-knit layer of epithelial cells called enterocytes which keeps out potential invaders.

Lysozyme binds with otherwise harmless complexes and survives the digestion process. So it slips in unnoticed and completely gets through the gut barrier.

This isn’t a threat in itself because humans actually produce lysozyme. What makes this particular enzyme dangerous is that it also binds to harmful bacteria.

So it unwittingly acts like a Trojan Horse, bringing in invaders into the bloodstream.

Auto-what Disease?

Even if lysozyme does make its way through the epithelial cell shield, it still wouldn’t be a problem for healthy people.

Assuming you have a healthy, functioning immune system, your cells would be able to push back bacterial threats that made it past the border.

Inflammation is your body’s usual response as it’s a defense mechanism to deal with the security threat in your gut.

What happens here is that your body orders your white blood cells to subdue the attackers and prevent further damage.

But for people with autoimmune disease, this is bad news.

When lysozyme gatecrashes the party with its unwanted guests, autoimmune sufferers produce autoantibodies as a response.

These are different from regular antibodies which only target specific bacteria and other harmful pathogens.

On the other hand, autoantibodies can’t tell friend from foe. This can have serious consequences.

When someone has too many autoantibodies, their immune system will start to turn on their own body.

This is the essence of autoimmune disease.

Autoantibodies target healthy tissue which leads to excessive inflammation and pain. It can also lead to organ degradation such as in the pancreas (a.k.a. Type 1 diabetes) or even throughout the whole body (such as with lupus).

Fighting the Barbarians at the Gate

Thus, people who have autoimmune disease can’t have eggs. Otherwise, their immune system will go haywire.

And by “haywire”, I mean a host of conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels) and celiac disease.

What makes this problem even trickier is that drugs only manage the immune system and suppress inflammation.

They don’t actually stop the body from creating those nasty autoantibodies in the first place.

Here’s something more alarming: the Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) estimates that 1 out of 5 people in the U.S. currently have autoimmune disease.

That comes to a total of 50 million people living with this condition.

In a perfect world, everyone can eat eggs and make use of its nutrients.

But with immune system problems getting more and more common, this is sadly NOT the case.

Thanks to the staggering amount of unhealthy, processed foods that we’re consuming by the truckload…

…more and more people are paying dearly for their poor eating habits.

Most folks don’t understand that the human body was designed for a different time.

This was when we used to eat whole, unprocessed foods that gave our bodies what it needed.

But today, scientists figured out how to take those foods and chemically transform them into an unnatural state.

And now our bodies are struggling because of the abuse we put it through.

Your taste buds might like these artificial treats, but they wreck your gut’s natural defense mechanism.
As such, your immune system suffers as a whole.

Once you let those invaders through the gates, the party’s over for you.

But there is hope.

With the power of the RIGHT food, you can start healing yourself and reverse the damage inflicted by the Western diet.

This cutting-edge documentary series will show you why most of today’s foods are addictive (even more than heroin!):

Health Food and You Docuseries

But more importantly, it will teach you how to break the spell for GOOD.

Once you keep these “Frankenstein foods” out of your life permanently, you can take back your immune system…

…rebuild your gut barrier…

…and eliminate threats like diabetes and cancer forever

It all starts by watching this video today – CLICK HERE

Unique Egg Recipes

Delicious and unique ways to cook eggs you might not ever thought of.

1

Egg Clouds ~ Recipe

Photo Credit: www.tastemade.com

Wake up to happy clouds of light, fluffy egg whites filled with a perfectly runny yolk center.

Full Recipe
2

Instant Pot Egg Loaf

Photo Credit: www.simplyhappyfoodie.com

The Instant Pot Egg Loaf is a speedy and efficient way to hard cook several eggs at once, and not have to peel them! This recipe makes an egg "Loaf" that you can just chop up when it is done cooking! Making a pressure cooker egg loaf is so easy!

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3

Spinach and Egg Breakfast Pizza

Photo Credit: skinnyms.com

Everyone loves pizza, so why not eat it for breakfast sometimes? This spinach and egg breakfast pizza is a new take on the classic Italian dish. It’s topped with eggs and spinach, so you can feel good about indulging.

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4

Homemade Egg Drop Soup Recipe | How to Make Egg Drop Soup

Photo Credit: www.mommymusings.com

This Homemade Egg Drop Soup Recipe is just like your favorite Chinese takeout soup and only takes 10 minutes to make.

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5

Shredded Sweet Potato Baked Egg Nests

Photo Credit: noshcity.com

These sweet potato egg nests are the perfect breakfast for when you’re trying to detox and get back on track.

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6

Green Chili Egg Casserole

Photo Credit: houseofnasheats.com

Green Chili Egg Casserole is an easy overnight breakfast casserole that is perfect for Christmas morning or any brunch occasion all year long!

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7

Eggs in Purgatory

Photo Credit: www.confettiandbliss.com

Scrumptious Eggs in Purgatory tops the list for easy egg recipes that are perfect for weekday breakfast, Sunday brunch, or what I call a reverse meal – breakfast for dinner. If you’re wondering about its fiery name, it refers to beautiful yet arrogant eggs hoping for divine intervention. They stare up longingly at Heaven from the mists of a sinfully thick, red, spicy sauce. This delicious hearty meal is best enjoyed with crusty bread, challah, homemade pita bread, or buttery thick-sliced toast.

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8

Baked Italian Egg Pastries

Photo Credit: www.recipegirl.com

This is a fancy way to get your baked egg- bake it within a pastry!  Add some extra goodies like sundried tomatoes, spinach and Parmesan cheese to give this breakfast its extra flavor boost.

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9

Egg Roll in a Bowl Recipe - Low-Carb & Keto

Photo Credit: www.evolvingtable.com

This Egg Roll in a Bowl recipe is loaded with Asian flavor and is a Paleo, Whole30, gluten-free, dairy-free and keto recipe to make for an easy weeknight dinner.  From start to finish, you can have this healthy and low-carb dinner recipe ready in under 30 minutes!

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10

Parmesan Egg Chips

Photo Credit: www.cookingpanda.com

You'll love snacking on these easy and yummy Parmesan Egg Chips.

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11

Ham and Cheese Egg Souffle

Photo Credit: www.savoryexperiments.com

This soufflé recipe will WOW your family and friends with how great it looks and tastes! Ham and Cheese Egg Soufflé brings a gourmet touch to your kitchen table

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